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EUCHARISTIC REVIVAL

Revive Alive, Jan. 20, 2023

- The Eucharistic Revival in the Diocese of Colorado Springs

Linda Oppelt 0 31 Article rating: No rating

The Eucharist commits us to the poor. To receive in truth the Body and Blood of Christ given up for us, we must recognize Christ in the poorest, his brethren:

‘You have tasted the Blood of the Lord, yet you do not recognize your brother, . . . You dishonor this table when you do not judge worthy of sharing your food someone judged worthy to take part in this meal . . . God freed you from all your sins and invited you here, but you have not become more merciful.’ — Catechism of the Catholic Church, No. 1397 (quote from St. John Chrysostom).

Head of Eucharistic Revival exhorts faithful to ‘live a eucharistic life’

by Deacon Rick Bauer

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COLORADO SPRINGS. On Jan. 7, priests and deacons from the Diocese of Colorado Springs gathered for a day of inspiration, reflection, discussion, and prayer. Co-led by Bishop Andrew Cozzens, chairman of the  Evangelization and Catechesis Committee for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), and Bishop James Golka, the morning activities at St. Gabriel Parish featured an extensive reflection on the Eucharist by Bishop Cozzens, including a detailed plan for the three-year Eucharistic Revival that he has been tasked with organizing.

Reclaiming Sunday

By Father Jim Baron

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Last month, we looked at how reclaiming Sunday for God and his purposes protects our human freedom. Why? Because it sets a limit to the other things that demand our time, our attention, our resources, our loyalty. Things that are not God. Things that do not love us like he does. Keeping Sunday as a day of worship and a day of rest is for our own personal good as well as the good of society.

Revive Alive - The Eucharistic Revival in the Diocese of Colorado Springs

Linda Oppelt 0 149 Article rating: 1.0

It is also called the “Holy Mass (Missa), because the liturgy in which the mystery of salvation is accomplished concludes with the sending forth (missio) of the faithful, so that they may fulfill God’s will in their daily lives.”  
 — Catechism of the Catholic Church, No.  1332

A Dark Spot on the Moon

By Sean M. Wright

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Born in 1192, St.  Juliana of Liège (or of Mont Cornillon) entered religious life as a Norbertine canoness regular. Of her, Pope Benedict XVI wrote: “She is little known but the Church is deeply indebted to her, not only because of the holiness of her life but also because, with her great fervor, she contributed to the institution of one of the most important solemn liturgies of the year: Corpus Christi.”

Reclaiming Sunday

By Father Jim Baron

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Father Jim Baron is Director of Mission and Strategic Planning for the Diocese of Colorado Springs. He is currently in residence at St. Gabriel the Archangel Parish.

In last month’s issue, I exhorted us to take back Sunday as the Lord’s Day. Two specific ways we do this is to go to Mass and enjoy actual rest. As much as keeping Sunday holy is an act of obedience to the Lord’s commandment, it is also a treat to us. This month, I think it is helpful to focus more on why that is true.

Revive Alive - The Eucharistic Revival in the Diocese of Colorado Springs

Linda Oppelt 0 125 Article rating: No rating

eucharistic revival 2022-2025Welcome to the second installation of Revive Alive, a series of teaching and reflection on the Eucharistic Revival in the Diocese of Colorado Springs. In addition to the monthly feature on Reclaiming Sunday as the Lord’s Day, these reflections are intended to offer some thoughts on the gift of the Eucharist and how we can embrace this life-giving gift as disciples of Jesus Christ. God wants to renew us and his Church through the Eucharist. Hopefully these will be of some help!

How the Feast of Corpus Christi Came About

By Sean M. Wright

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Jacques Pantaléon, a humble cobbler’s son, was sent to a monastery school where he excelled in canon and common law studies.

Pantaléon was serving as archdeacon of the cathedral of Liège in Belgium when the visions of Sister, later Saint, Juliana, prioress of the Norbertine canonesses, became known to Robert de Thourotte, Bishop of Liège.

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